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DECs map of Emerald Ash Borer knows sites and danger zones

DEC's map of Emerald Ash Borer knows sites and danger zones

The Emerald Ash Borer has officially been found in NY state.  This is an invasive exotic, species that lays their eggs in the ash tree and the subsequent larva eat and destroy the trees as the insects grow and develop.  The area this insect was found is approximately 10 miles (as a bug flies) from our farm.   This is devastating news to us.  Not only because it is never good to have an invasive species take over, but because we have many mature ash trees on our property.  So now we are in the position of having to research and learn what we as landowners of forested land with ash should do given that we are in the quarantined area.

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We have taken some time off from the computer and have been spending much more time outside working, all apologies for being lax with the blog.  Things we’ve done or are working on are selling the vast majority of our stock.  We have kept back a few GOS and some of the Tamworths and we have sold most of the goats.  Its been tough because its hard to decide to size down and emotions sometime come into play. We decided earlier this summer to downsize to free up more time to improve infrastructure.  We have dug lines and assisted the electrician in putting in electric to the land. Even the pigs and dog’s joined in.

The pigs helped to backfill some of the trench...

the trench... around 500' of it

Currently, as I type, I’m waiting on the electrical inspector to co

me out and approve the work.Then we will have electric to run some permanent lines and for general comfort issues.

We are still getting quotes on wells so we don’t have to haul water daily allowing us to set up automatic waterers.  The sawmilling has been slow becuase we have not had the tractor freed up from the backhoe attachment and its harder to manuver small paths with the extra stuff on a tractor, plus you can’t really skid logs well with it on.  So as soon as the electrical inspection clears we will be cutting more wood.

I’ve spent the past few evenings reading Michal Pollan’s Omnivore’s Dilemma which is an interesting read.  I highly recommend it to anyone interested in food and agriculture.

We haven’t had the opportunity to see Food Inc. due to the limited distribution however it seems to be along the same vein as the Omnivore’s diemma and something which we hope will be at a theater near us rather soon.

The pigs that we have kept are growing nicely.  We’ve been moving the adult pigs weekly as that had been sufficient given the lower numbers and dry ground.  Now that the rain is back I anticipate our weekend we be spent setting up new paddocks and moving everyone again as the wet ground makes for easy rooting and isn’t able to stand up to pigs as well as the dry.  Whenever I ead back out I’ll try to get a picture of this same view today to show how much it has been trampled since the rains started.

Port-a-huts on pasture..

Port-a-huts on pasture..

Whats more to say… Ian got it stuck driving where he shouldn’t.  Thank god for good family and good neighbors.

Can you spot the front tires?

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NY state is decommissioning its prison farm program.

“DOCS runs farm operations at a dozen of its 69 correctional facilities: Green Haven and Beacon (Dutchess County), Clinton (Clinton County), Eastern and Wallkill (Ulster County), Elmira (Chemung County), Greene (Greene County), Groveland (Livingston County), Sullivan (Sullivan County), Wyoming (Wyoming County), and Mid-State and Washington. The farms, which produce meat, milk and vegetables for the production of meals in the prison system, are intended to provide inmates with vocational experience. However, the farms have become increasingly costly to operate when viewed in light of the limited benefit they provide.

Beacon, Clinton and Washington run beef operations. Wallkill has a dairy farm. Elmira, Green Haven, Greene, Sullivan and Wyoming operate dairy farms and milk processing operations. Groveland grows field crops. Mid-State grows field crops and vegetables. And Eastern runs dairy, beef, beef processing and sawmill operations.

The farm operations employ 39 correction officers and 41 full-time civilian employees, and 188 inmates work on the farms. The correction officer jobs will be eliminated through attrition. DOCS will offer the civilian employees other jobs within the agency to the extent possible and will work with those employees and other State agencies to enhance the employees’ opportunities for transfer to other State jobs during the six- to eight-month decommissioning of the farms. The ultimate elimination of the prison farms will produce a net savings to DOCS of $3.4 million annually.

DOCS will work with the New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets to assist in decommissioning the farms.”

As you can see  their explanation is budget justified by limited benefit of farming to the NY prision population.  In a report by WBFO, it was reported that, “.”

Though I was never a 4H kid, this argument runs counter to all research on the benefits of 4H, including coping skills, public speaking, leadership, etc.  Now granted these farm are not running on the 4H model, however there are able to teach many real world skills that in many circumstances, people in prison may not have learned while growing up.  They can learn budgeting, business managment, marketing, inventory, shipping/receiving, general vet tech skills.  The practical skills go beyond learning how to clean a barn.  The DOC’s view on the career benefits alone shows their sterotype of the role of a farmer, that they don’t have marketable skills off the farm.  In my opinion its just the opposite.  To be a successfull farmer, you need multiple skill sets all of which are transferrable to jobs in any sector.

This program, if ran correctly, could provide emotional and interpersonal skills useful to the inmates for life, along with skills that are usable in any 9-5 job.  I truly believe if they ran the prison farms in conjunction with a combination 4H/shock treatment facility model they would be well on their way to reducing recidivism.

After two days off work being ill today was a long day back in work. The day was made even longer by one of our wethers getting out and eating our trees. Then Riley, the goat that just kidded last weekend developed a temperature. I called the vet out and she thought it looked like she did not expel all of her placenta when kidding. So she gave some shots and then chatted a bit. $100 for the checkup and meds and call out after hours which I don’t think was too bad at all. Then however we go to finish feeding the pigs up on the land. Luckily they hadn’t farrowed because I was not in the mood to notch ears and process them tonight. The ladies did however escape by pushing their hay bale onto the fence line. They were rooting away when we came. Luckily they have learned to come running for feed when they see us so they weren’t too much trouble to get back into their field. It wasn’t however, what I wanted to do tonight. I was hoping to quietly feed everyone and then go to bed. Tomorrow is a day school on swine at Cornell so we have to be up at 3:30 to get there in time. I need to be in bed about an hour ago.

On a high note the peepers were out for the first time this year. I’m marking my calendar March 27th the day the peepers sang.

Johann 1 day old

The land prior to pigs

The land prior to pigs

Less than 24 hours of pigs on the ground

Less than 24 hours of pigs on the ground

Pigs on the land two full days

Pigs on the land two full days

Ian hating the mud...

Ian hating the mud...

Saturday the pigs arrived at the pasture land from our woods down the road.  Since then it has rained and rained and rained.  Today we had a break in the rain because it turned to snow.  It is supposed to rain Tuesday and Wednesday as well.  The animals and I are sooo not looking forward to it.  I guess its easy to forget how much mud hinders daily life on a farm.  I know I was sick of the snow and cold but overall having it cold and dry and frozen is easier on all of us than having wet and cold and mud.

Because of the mud I added more straw to the huts tonight as I wanted to make sure that the girls were able to keep cozy and dry.  Prior to getting the port-a-huts we always had huts with floors.  These proved to be terribly difficult to move and sanitize hence the port-a-huts.  However, when it comes to mud nothing beats a floor.  I figure we’ll need to add a bale every other day if the rain keeps up.  That way the ground builds up a straw pack keeping everything upabove the mud level.  I’ve recently bought  straw at 4.95 a bale because we needed it (hay just isn’t as good for bedding when its muddy plus the pigs eat a lot of it, leaving them with less bedding)  With the straw they are much less likely to eat it and it holds up better in the wet than does hay.  Luckily I found a man selling hay for $2 a bale.  I told him I’d take all he has.  This weekend we are getting the 50 bales he has figuring the money will be well spent.

We still don’t have a clue when the pigs will definately farrow.  Tomorrow is the full moon.  The girls are due anytime after the 12th.  I know I saw a boar mount each of the tamworths the day that they were put together.  I also saw one of the old spots breeding as late as January 18th.  This means that the piglets could start coming as early as the 12th by the math and then as late as April 13th.  Its always a waiting game this time of year.

Speaking of waiting, the goats are bagging up real well.  I still have two weeks until the scheduled kidding date for Riley one of the LaMancha does.  She will be a first freshener and is  due the 21st.  She has an udder that really impreses me.  This is my first time with dairy goats but I think she is looking huge.  Her ligaments are still really strong so I don’t expect her to kid soon.   I just don’t know how much larger an udder can get on a goat.  If it keeps going, in two weeks time it will be weigh as much as her!!!  Rileys udder 2 weeks to scheduled due date

Side view of the LaMancha udder 2 weeks till due date

Side view of the LaMancha udder 2 weeks till due date


This picture was too cute not to post, but it does remind us that we need our boots today. Everything is either covered in or actually just plain old MUD. Today is the day of mud and flood. Our sump pump stopped while we were working outside and when I came in we had about 8″ of water in the basement. The hot water heater’s pilot is out and we now have no hot water until things dry out. We all love cold showers on cold wet muddy days *sarcasm here*

On a brighter side Ian has made good progress on the transportable water dispenser for the pigs. We think it may be finished this evening to take up to them. Here’s hoping we don’t get stuck in the mud.

Well we got the ladies up to their new land yesterday.  I was silly and forgot to put the memory card in the camera so i didn’t get any pictures at all.  Overall it was pretty easy.  The girls loaded well and we had no problems separating them out.  The main fiasco’s of the day were having the truck slide into the drainage ditch while backing the truck and trailer up to the entrance to their old house and then up to the land getting the truck stuck in the mud and needing to fire up the tractor to pull the truck and trailer up to the pigs new plot.  Once we got everyone moved Ian and I spent and hour or so laying in the port-a-hut watching the girls and giving them scratches as they wandered past.

So far they have been up there 16 hours and counting.  All I can say is that they are mighty happy and rooting away.

Notice the foreground where the fence stops the pigs.  They have rooted a lot in 16 hours.

Notice the foreground where the fence stops the pigs. They have rooted a lot in 16 hours.

This morning when we went to check on the ladies at around 7am it was in the 40’s. When we arrived to check on them after their first night at the land, we found that Fran and Emily were not sleeping in the huts but had chosen to lay beside the large hay bale.  The weather has been considerably nicer than it has been all 2009.  We even hit the mid 60’s yesterday.  They must have wanted to appreciate the view of the night sky and the good weather before more snow and cold nights come again.

As you can see from the picture the pigs were pretty active.  In the short amount of time that they have been there they have made a definite impact on the ground having rooted quite a bit already.  That being said, even our footprint could be seen where we walked.  We figure that given their quick work, we may be moving them on in the next week or two.  We’ll have to play it by ear to determine how much is just enough and not too much.  We want them to turn it, not compact it.

We are also trying to balance out a couple of other things.  A: We don’t want the manure to be too “hot” and kill any plants.  B: We want to make sure that everything has enough time to break down enough to reduce concerns for pathogens.  From what I have found:
PART 205—NATIONAL ORGANIC PROGRAM

Section 205.203

(1) Raw animal manure, which must be composted unless it is:

(i) Applied to land used for a crop not intended for human consumption;

(ii) Incorporated into the soil not less than 120 days prior to the harvest of a product whose edible portion has direct contact with the soil surface or soil particles; or

(iii) Incorporated into the soil not less than 90 days prior to the harvest of a product whose edible portion does not have direct contact with the soil surface or soil particles;

We’ve already discussed not using this area for our root crops but rather for some of the corn and pumpkin production.  This way we can test two plots to see if there is difference between having the pigs tilling and manuring or not and how this affects the productivity of the corn and pumpkin.  Either way we will be well within the harvest timelines for the application of the fresh manure.

Also speaking of manure, we have also discussed that its nearly time to clean out the winter chicken housing.  Now that the weather is warmer they don’t need the deep litter composting down in the coop to provide the extra heat.  This will be a task for one of the upcoming weekends.

This weekend, specifically today, we are finishing up the new automatic water dispensors.   We found a supplier of all kinds of food grade tubs in Falconer NY.  We chose two large metal tubs with re-sealable lids.  These are going on a trailer that can be hauled back and forth so we can fill it up here and then take it to the pigs.  I’ll get some pictures of this as Ian progresses and we’ll post more about it sometime later.

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Just a quick post.

We ran to Erie PA this morning to get our truck serviced.  On our way back we saw the first robin this year.  The weather is warm mid 50’s with scattered showers.  I’ll take it over the snow and cold.  Though we are heading out now after a 10 minute break to go move the pigs.